Local Food News — Canada

Quebec Food Summit will last for a year

Quebec’s Food Summit will start in October with the first of three preparatory meetings to be focused on the theme of consumers “today and tomorrow”. The second meeting will be in February 2017 and will focus on developing the potential of Quebec’s food industry markets, domestically and overseas. The third consultation session, next May, will focus on the prospects for “agricultural entrepreneurs” and fishermen. Agriculture minister Pierre Paradis launched the initiative at the Jean-Talon Market in Montreal, saying he wanted to develop a bio-food policy for Quebec, the main measures to be funded in the 2018 budget. La Terre de chez nous story (in French).  English summary thanks to Qu’anglo Farm & Food Briefs

 

Scaling up Through Food Procurement Learning Labs

Newfoundland, a province known as The Rock, is not known for its farmland but is known for its culinary creativity and for making the most of resources on the edge of the Atlantic.  When the School Lunch Association, a charitable school food service provider on the Avalon Peninsula, decided to join the local food movement, they knew there would be obstacles. Local food procurement Learning Labs provide an innovative way to navigate these types of obstacles. These Labs, modelled after those of US School Food FOCUS, bring together key stakeholders to articulate their vision and goals. Participants then agree on a handful of priority actions that can realistically be accomplished in a short time frame. Farm to Cafeteria Canada post.

 

Death of the farmer

I’ve been spending some time this summer trying to solve a local mystery, who is trying to kill our local farms and why? The mystery started for me with the local grocery stores, No Frills, Sobeys, Food Basics and The Superstore. These are the stores that are immediately available to me in the Beamsville area and every one that I go in to is selling anything but local fruits and vegetables, and this is what raised the question for me — Where is my local produce? St. Catharines Standard story.

 

The Food 53: Celebrating the most influential people in Canadian food

This summer, the Globe names, and celebrates, the most influential people in Canadian food – chefs and CEOs, farmers and winemakers, plus researchers, restaurateurs and, of course, eaters. In the first of a five-part series, meet The Faithful, the ones who are winning the long game: the first chef to make Indian food buzzy, the $11-billion cheese magnate, Canada’s first family of craft beer and more. The Globe and Mail story.

 

Market Your Restaurant with Pokemon GO

  1. Advertise the Pokémon you have found (also know as ‘sightings’). Yes, this means you have to download the app and actually play but this can bring in some great business. It’s like you’re playing a game and advertising at the same time. 2. Name a dish of the week after a Pokémon. People love this stuff! Or, even better, make the items look like Pokémon balls or monsters. Lure them – literally. This is by far the best advantage of marketing the game. An important part of the game are PokéStops, which are points of interest that give out in-game freebies. allowing the player to advance in the game. Restaurants Canada blog.

 

Community Gardens and Local Food Procurement

Community gardens and local food procurement policies and programs are gaining in popularity as health promotion strategies for obesity prevention. Community gardens are defined as the convergence of multiple individuals joining together in diverse settings to grow fruits, vegetables, and other plant varieties (1). Local food procurement refers to strategies to increase the amount and availability of food locally sourced from within a community. This synthesis explores the literature on community gardens and local food procurement in relation to nutrition, physical activity (PA), and body weight. Key Findings: Findings from this synthesis indicate that community gardens and local procurement programs, policies, and initiatives have the potential to result in positive impacts related to nutrition, such as improved attitudes and asking behaviours, and increased fruit and vegetable consumption. Power Up For Health post.

 

Local Food and Urban Agriculture Strategy

The 2015 Economic Development Strategy includes a recommendation for the City to develop an agriculture and food production strategy with the purposes of diversifying the local economy and reducing dependence on food importation. With financial support from the Canada-Yukon Growing Forward 2 Fund, the City is moving forward with developing the Whitehorse Local Food & Urban Agriculture Strategy. City of Whitehorse post.

 

Lawns are for suckers. Plant a garden — for the climate!

Ripping out your lawn and planting kale and peppers won’t just lead to great stir-fry — a new study finds it could make major contributions to fighting climate change, too. Two pounds of carbon emissions could be prevented for every pound of homegrown vegetables consumed, according to researchers at the University of California Santa Barbara. And that could add up to a big impact: Give a highly productive garden to every family in California, the researchers calculated, and it would take the state 10 percent of the way to its previous goal of cutting emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Grist blog.

 

Urban garden goes high-tech in Edmonton

Growing up in Edmonton, Victor Benitez had little experience with farming. But the city kid still loved to grow food. And he loved the idea of helping people. That led the recent physics graduate to develop an urban farming system he thinks can change how people access fresh, local produce. The initial results are good: this summer, Benitez grew 400 pounds of vegetables beside a north-side community rink. The bounty was donated to local residents and the Edmonton Mennonite Centre for Newcomers. CBC News story.

 

Community vegetable program bringing 4,000 pounds of fresh produce to Labrador Inuit

Ed Mesher has been going door-to-door this summer, delivering some 4,000 pounds of fresh local produce to Happy Valley-Goose Bay residents who use the community freezer program. Run by the Nunakatiget Inuit Corporation, the program has more than 150 beneficiaries in Happy Valley-Goose Bay and Mud Lake. The program provides 400 pounds of greens, 1,600 pounds of carrots and turnip, and 2,000 pounds of potatoes to the community’s seniors and disabled. CBC News story.

 

AND IF YOU HAVE TIME

 

You may be familiar with food deserts, but have you heard of a food swamp?

No, it’s not the place from which Guy Fieri sprung. A food swamp is an area with an abundance of fast food and liquor stores, but nowhere to buy real groceries. Beverly Grant of Mo Betta Green MarketPlace in Denver explains the difference — and how to turn a swamp into an oasis — in this new short film from Perennial Plate. Grist briefly.

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